Top image: The ‘toolbox’ contains two Panasonic TS-950 robots that perform additive manufacturing, a kind of 3D printing (Autodesk)

Technology

Autodesk puts printing factory in shipping containers

11 November 2018 | By BIM+ staff

Autodesk has introduced a building-component printing factory in shipping containers for building sites

The trial concept combines two Panasonic TS-950 robots that perform additive manufacturing, a kind of 3D printing, in a shipping container that can be trucked to construction sites to produce bespoke metal components.

Autodesk called it “a large-scale additive manufacturing ‘toolbox’ for the construction industry”.

“With this robot-filled shipping container, we’re bringing manufacturing technology to the construction site,” said Autodesk last week.

The robots came from Dutch robotic welding group, Valk Welding.

Autodesk will showcase the concept this week at Autodesk University Las Vegas, and plans to display it in Europe after that.

The container can be shipped to construction sites (Autodesk)

“For the construction industry, imagine what you could do with the ability to make large parts out of steel or other metals right on the spot,” wrote Autodesk vice president Nicolas Mangon.

The company enlisted Dutch construction group Dura Vermeer to come up with ideas.

Using generative design and additive manufacturing, Dura Vermeer said it could create a customised “steel spider” connector for fixing a glass curtain wall to the steel structure of a building.

The technique could also combine separate components into a single one, to simplify the supply chain, Dura Vermeer said.

Top image: The ‘toolbox’ contains two Panasonic TS-950 robots that perform additive manufacturing, a kind of 3D printing (Autodesk)

Additive manufacturing could allow Dura Vermeer to make a customised “steel spider” connector for fixing a glass curtain wall to a building’s steel structure (Autodesk)