Technology

New device detects drone activity up to 20km away

26 March 2018 | By BIM+ staff

A detection device that can alert control room operatives to drone activity in nearby airspace has been launched.

Developed by commercial drone specialist COPTRZ, it is expected that the drone detection solution will form part of plans for new build prisons, military bases and city buildings with high security measures.

AeroScope, launched in partnership with DJI, allows an operator to track telemetry data from drones in surrounding airspace of up to 20km (12.5 miles).

In effect, itis a drone licence plate detection system that provides security teams with the data required to be able to quickly and effectively protect against drone intrusion.

By intercepting the current communications link between a drone and its remote controller, AeroScope is able to broadcast real-time identification information, including UAV serial code, make/model of aircraft, UAV position, speed, latitude and pilot location.

Steve Coulson, founder and managing director at COPTRZ, said: “Security is high on the agenda during a build process and we see this fitting in alongside it with the increasing number of drones taking the to the skies.

“Drones offer huge threats to high-security facilities including military bases, prisons and police headquarters. They are used, for example, to smuggle drugs, drop packages and invade privacy.”

COPTRZ says the launch has been anticipated for some time after increased security concerns regarding the use of drones.

With the current equipment available, secure areas such as prisons, airports, military bases and stadiums are powerless to know if, when and where they’re vulnerable to all of the threats drones pose.

Only last year, it was reported that there had been a 168% increase in drone and commercial aircraft near misses over a two-year period. This drastic trend is expected to increase year-on-year with more than 20 million drones in operation by 2020.

Drones offer huge threats to high-security facilities including military bases, prisons and police headquarters. They are used, for example, to smuggle drugs, drop packages and invade privacy.– Steve Coulson, COPTRZ